Never pay up front. Some companies will ask you to pay a small fee up-front for access to survey lists, which is absolutely unnecessary. Check Terms and Conditions, FAQs, or any other area on a survey company’s page containing information on how the company operates. (If such information is hard or impossible to locate, consider it a red flag and cross that site off your list.)
What does that mean for you? It means Nielsen will pay you $50 a year to keep their app on your favorite internet browsing device. The app itself collects statistics on your internet usage anonymously, so you never have to worry about any data being linked to you. And the best part is, the app takes up barely any space and doesn’t slow down your phone or tablet at all!
Consider some other ways you could make money online or elsewhere. You could start a website, try your hand at creating videos or build your own products to sell on the Internet. Unfortunately, you're going to need a fair amount of expertise to make it in any of these areas, and if you don't have the know-how yet, you'll almost certainly need some intense training in Web design, editing or the like. 
I'm a 20 year old college student with little to no money also. I was looking on search engines for ways to make money just like you. Since you are asking about online jobs with no particular skills, are you willing to learn a new skill? I currently sell t-shirts online to make some extra cash on the side. This is a rising way to make money and I think that you should take advantage of it. I only used free methods starting out and once I realized I wanted to make it into a business, I made a small investment to purchase Adobe Illustrator to design my t-shirts. The skills that you can pick up are simple texts and shapes. I think it's a great way for any one to make some extra cash. It requires little to no startup costs and you don't have to worry about shipping. Just upload your designs and let the money roll in. You can use Merch By Amazon, Redbubble, Etsy, and other Print on Demand websites to upload your designs to.
Just be aware that anything that talks about $50-80/hr part-time is not real and/or citing the absolute maximum top most unethical performers. That is what you might make online for some highly skilled specialized tech support. Those jobs exist, but mostly the people in them are actual experienced professionals in those fields. It is not typically done as a side light.
OneOpinion. This site is a survey aggregator with an effective screening process. Its dashboard is informative and displays helpful sections, such as your activity and a customer support form. The site was above average at picking surveys we qualified for. As for the points awarded per survey, 500 or 1,000 points may look high at first, but when converted to actual rewards, you’d get 50 cents or a dollar. Also, you can’t cash out until you reach 25,000 points, equivalent to $25. Read more in our OneOpinion review.
Survey Club has been offering online paid surveys since 2005, and in the fast paced every changing world of the web that’s a reassuringly long amount of time. They are a bit of an acquired taste, in that they specialise in long, detailed surveys for high end clients rather than the quick and cheerful consumer surveys that you may be more familiar with. Whilst this does mean that you may have to commit a bit more time, it does mean that if you have the patience to persevere with them they pay more money than most survey and reward sites. They also offer local taste tests (see what I said about ‘an acquired taste’?), and secret shopper opportunities.
Like many survey sites, Toluna rewards you with points, which you can then cash out for vouchers for the usual suspects like Amazon and iTunes, or money through PayPal. A slightly novel element of the site’s payment plan is to offer the chance to take your points out early if you gamble them for prizes. While you have to store up a grand total of 60,000 points before you can claim vouchers for around $12 – something some people find to be a downside of the site – if you are willing to settle for a prize, you can play with just 500 points. You can decide to try your luck with a “giftie”, a kind of scratch card game. By gambling some points, you can see if you have won the gift or lost your points – so it is not one for the faint hearted!
If you can't find any information on other sites or forums, there are some things about the website you can check for yourself. The first thing we recommend is to look for a privacy policy. Having one on the site that is easily accessible to users is a clear sign of credibility. It shows that the company is at least making some promises as to how your information will be used. Lacking a privacy policy is a clear red flag and often signifies a scam.
Labeling these as pyramid schemes is not a constructive way to criticize this business practice. Pyramid schemes are illegal, this is not. Better to point out to our friends and colleagues the amoral elements and traditions of MLMs (manipulation, secrecy about organization and operations, using people, use of cult rhetoric to lock people down, targeting people from abroad who are looking for opportunity in a new country, targeting young/ impressionable people).
Sometimes survey invitation links direct you to other survey companies, rather than keeping things in-house, which can feel a bit like spam. As is common in the industry, you can sometimes get stuck filling out lengthy qualifying questions which take up to 30 minutes just to see if you’re eligible for a survey. Needless to say if you find out you are not then this is extremely frustrating.
They used to be cash-only, but in 2013 they switched over to a points system. Panelists can share their opinions in surveys and complete other various offers in exchange for points. 100 points is equal to $1, and most of their surveys pay up to $3. Survey topics are diverse and cover a variety of different topics. Pinecone Research is unique in that they emphasize consumption related surveys more than other panels.
A brand new way of selling t-shirts has arrived online, and sites like Teespring allow users to sell shirts that are of a great quality and don’t get created until there are enough buyers interested in the product, sort of like a shirt-on-demand business. Earnings for the campaigns can be discerned via the site’s data about the amount of shirts sold and the price per item.
I know that I-say and many others on this list are available in the U.S. As a quick word of caution, if you sign up for these/start taking surveys, actually be honest with your responses. Not just because it's more accurate for the researchers, but because a lot of these sites have technology to blacklist you if you fill out the surveys too quickly or they can tell you're not actually paying attention.
Is it a survey? If it's a raffle, you will just get downvoted to oblivion here. Most people here don't like raffles. If it's a guaranteed payout and pays decently, then it will be well received here. However, I don't recommend posting it on here. Unfortunately, there are a lot of scammers here who will try to do your survey multiple times. I suggest taking it to a different subreddit, or an alternative site such as mTurk.
MintVine is a cool looking paid survey site that makes it easy to complete a survey, without having to spend too long learning how to do it. One of the things I liked most about MintVine is that they offer a huge amount of ways to get paid: there’s the old favorite PayPal of course, but you can also choose Starbucks cards, Amazon and other gift cards, and even restaurant cards. Your surveys can pay for your next meal, and it’s easy to rack up points here. Some users have reported delays in receiving payments however, but this isn’t a scam and MintVine are working hard to speed up their process and iron our any glitches. If they do, they could be heading into the Survey Cool top ten in 2018.
Velasquez says our information could be used for questionable studies or sold to health insurers, for example. Or it could be stolen, which is a risk with any website that stores personal data. Most of the information we gave away seemed harmless — our shopping habits and travel plans, for example. But information like your birthdate could be used with other stolen data to take your identity. So keep that in mind as you’re answering questions.
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