2. Use your hacking skills for good. If you know how to adeptly hack into websites, put your skills to use with HackerOne.com, a platform that pays their network of more than 100,000 hackers for finding and reporting software vulnerabilities. According to data on HackerOne's website, 12 percent of their hackers make $20,000 or more per year. Approximately 3 percent of the hackers are making over $300,000, and 1.1 percent are making over $350,000, according to HackerOne.com.
When offered a grand promise for a seemingly small price, many more are likely to fall for it. Being human, the idea of paying very little for great return is incredibly enticing. This is the leading idea behind offers like “Earn $200 every day! Just $10 for access to our exclusive list of high paying surveys.”  When entering the arena of paid online surveys, it's important to be wary of any offer like this that seems too good to be true.

Survey Junkie. This site is a smaller survey aggregator, but it stands out. The site has a clean, easy-to-use dashboard and offers a high point value for each survey you complete. The point system is direct and shows you how much your points are worth in dollars right on the dashboard. But you have to get to 1,000 points, equal to $10, before you can cash out. Check out our Survey Junkie review for more information.
Something unique that MyPoints offers that most other similar companies don't offer is the ability to earn cash back on some in-store purchases at select stores, along with their online paid surveys. Also, although their online store cashback rates aren't the highest in the industry (ironically, Swagbucks beats them on several offers), they do have special offers that other companies don't have, such as a bonus to sign up for Amazon Prime.

Don’t overshare. If you’re asked to give your Social Security number, bank account number or driver’s license number, leave the survey. Velasquez recommends being “intentional” with sharing other private information with survey sites. Answering questions about a TV commercial probably is fine, but giving medical information may not be worth the risk.
Scammers use a diverse variety of methods to allure and dupe unsuspecting victims. Some ads and offers look so real that even the most seasoned internet veterans can be tricked. However, many scams target people new to the market who may be more susceptible to “get rich quick” schemes because they're unaware of what you can reasonably make taking surveys. It is incredibly uncommon to be offered more than $10 to complete a 20 minute survey. Not that one offering that or more is definitely a scam, it's just important to be cautious. While some experienced and well credited survey takers receive legitimate offers paying that pay big money, if you're new to survey taking you should definitely steer clear of anyone offering you hundreds to complete a survey.
I tried Mechanical Turk fairly extensively back in the day, I'd say 3-4ish years ago (very rough guess), and gave up once I realized it was impossible to make more than, maybe, $2/hr on pointless, tedious activities, stuff like inputting receipts for 15 cents. Is there more dynamic work available now? What sorts of activities do you find yourself doing there? Do the employers pay more now?

I reside in Jamaica and I am at a disadvantage in securing paid surveys because of my location as the so-called first world countries receive all the choice survey sites leaving the crumbs that fall from the Master’s table. The survey field needs to be levelled because the advent of I. T capability the world is just one community everyone is aware of what goes on everywhere.
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